About your Search

20130201
20130228
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN2 55
LANGUAGE
English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55
access like over here. i know this is hard to see with the light, the unite the will to use our copies that we have been back afterwards. .. they also would benefit from having their revenue source to do a lot more, so this is a wonderful that you can use. let's see, this is another prop that shows carbon energy efficiency spending relative to the carbon intensity that would show you might be spending a bit of money on energy efficiency but you have the carbon intensive energy sources in your state. what are the spaces that fall into that particular squadron, and that might be other candidates for energy efficiency programs. all right with. moving along. this is an example of how you have the comparison interface that the tool allows you to do. this is an interactive feature. so, for example, you hear that the epa is moving forward on greenhouse gases and that it's very receptive to the alternative means of achieving compliance. what would you want to do? with the market base things that you want to do? this particular tool would allow you to look at for example the benefits of
: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cure's global women's cancer summit. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president, but she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inaug
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
of focus enables us to have that perspective in a different way than if we were running a television network for if we were focusing on a larger more diverse demographic. >> for no wonder if you could address the opportunities you see on the horizon in engaging in a public audience is whether it is the next iteration of crowd sourcing or whatever it is, what better way is you see to engage the audience in ways that intersect in the to double lines that you've described that have impact both on your social consequence as well as your sustainability but it begins with ways to engage them in the journalism. estimate what we are trying to do from the editorial perspective is go to their readers rather than create new products that ask them to come to us. so being very much engaged in a conversation particularly on twitter and some extent facebook is an important strategic priority for what we are doing. we are also experimenting with ideas of trying to use the technology to engage in those dialogues in a way that hasn't been possible something like google hangout there's about 25 folks i
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
and it was time for us to become a colony again. they were winning that war, marching up the eastern seaboard destroys city after city, destroyed washington, d.c., burned down the white house. next stop, baltimore but as they came into the chesapeake bay, the armada of ships, warships a source of the eye could see, it was looking grim. fort mchenry standing right there. general armistead who was in charge of fort mchenry had a large american flag commission to fly in front of the fort. the admiral in charge of the british fleet was offended and said take that flag down. you have until dusk until you take that flag and but if you don't we will reduce you to ashes. there was a young amateur poet on board by the name of francis scott key, sent by president madison to try to obtain the release of an american physician who was being held captive. he overheard the british plans they were not going to let them off the ship. he mourned as dusk approached. he more for his fledgling young nation. and as the sun set, then bartman's, missiles, so much debris, he strained trying to see was the flag still
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
complex issue, because of the definition of taxes, penalties and related issues. >> yeah, i think using the term subsidy by its nature, it makes people nervous. subsidy seems have sort of a connotation use in recent years of something untoward. i guess the way i would look at it, i hear your question as a bit of a philosophical question, and less of a nuts and bolts question. i think philosophically, there is fairly broad agreement that you subsidize things that have a social benefit. that they have a benefit that goes beyond the individual and it's not decision reflected in the marketplace. and so i think that you have to look at it that way, if something is not being valued that would make, you know, society better, then you have to come up with some way of evaluating it. whether tax is one way of doing that. i think as far as a market mechanism, it is the way we have tended to look at subsidy as sort of the lubricant to allow these new technologies to find their footing in the marketplace. they do, without a doubt. we have our technology curve and i can show you the map of all of our
and equipping that we did of nonlethal assistance to the nonviolent opposition allowed us -- has allowed us over the last year to really broaden the u.s. knowledge of what's going on in syria, who the key players are. and i think if you end up, if you're getting close to a circumstance where there might be either rationalized or let's call it a highly decentralized result to the conflict, then you really want to know 100 people. you don't want to be dependent on just walking a white horse down main street at damascus and hoping that some leader jumps on and we go. so this is the kind of sort of ground, foundation building that you have to undertake and that we've done. >> could you tell us something a little more specific about how you're actually doing that? do you know 100 people in aleppo? you've got a team of 200. are you able to get people on the ground, work with others? >> sirree is a really good challenge, because you have to work out of a third country, which has its own for distinct feelings about what's going on inside of syria and what it might mean to them. so we're working -- up un
mistreatment, the employer can decide to use e-verify against the worker. when employers can easily abuse some workers of all american workplace suffer. e-verify employers routinely violate the program rules, and that hurts workers but the only way a worker knows that he has in e-verify period is if an employer tells them. e-verify is a program that space on agreement between the employer and the government. and workers are really just stuck on the sidelines, even though they have the most to lose from an era. for instance, 42% workers say that they are not notified by the employer of an e-verify error. and if a worker doesn't know that an error exist, and no way to correct it. is vital important that the worker know about errors in the records because errors can lead to workers getting fired, through a final nonconfirmation but because the likelihood of your citizens is at risk even seemingly small error rates really matter. using uscis own statistics, only 50,000 is workers experience and be verify air lest you. that's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verif
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
the country and around the world and it will influence policy in a way that makes sense that most of us tend to agree with. it would be different around the edges but everyone in the room agrees that it needs to be done. that's what i'm getting at. what can you tell us about that? >> i think that. one of the as the white house chief of staff i met with both world leaders and heads of major interest groups in the country. the way you carry yourself in that position as where the gravitas comes from. i feel like in the business dealings that i've had it is building a trust. it's about having her credibility and speaking clearly and saying what you think. i have done more than my share of public speaking and appearances and i'm not afraid of taking issues public and expressing complicated ideas people can understand. i'm not sure how to put a specific question behind gravitas but i think the career path i've had very few people leave the role of the staff and become a member of the cabinet. i've had a path that is not the normal and that lends itself out. >> i wish you well because -- >> do you
republicans will finally allow a vote on the nomination of robert bacharach to the u.s. court of appeals for the tenth circuit. because of this filibuster, something that stopped robert bacharach way last year, a man who came out of the senate judiciary committee unanimously, all democrats, all republicans voting for him, the people of oklahoma, colorado, kansas, new mexico, utah and wyoming have been needlessly denied his services as a tenth circuit judge for seven months. now, the judicial vacancies have again risen to almost 90. we have dozens of judges that get blocked for month after month after month, and then the republicans finally allow a vote on it, it passed with 90 votes or 95 votes or 100 votes, but every time that happens, the federal courts have diminished. every time that's happened, aside from the fact that the people of america wonder what in heaven's name we're doing in this body, anything as foolish as that, but the courts, the federal courts are supposed to be so impartial and outside of politics, they appear to be mixed up in politics. how does anybody, from any of
of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progress. we found that a simple to understand savings target is a framework that resonates with workers and employers and we believe this approach would be helpful for people who switch jobs frequently and who may have a number of retirement accounts making it even more difficult to evaluate one saving strategy. in closing, there is a path to retirement security for most americans. the road is and always an easy one. many constituencies have a role for insuring success. first, workers need to take an active role in saving and managing for their financial future. employers need more flexibility and the rules and regulation to design benefit plans which meet the diverse needs of their work force without the fiduciary liability and increased coverage cost. third service providers like fidelity need to continue to innovate around how to help plan sponsors optimize their benefit programs and service participants based on their needs. last, we ask policy makers to consider a variety of ideas to improve the retirement savings outcomes. examples
of the fact that was used to talk about the king is the fact that he was preventing people from coming to the country and being able to migrate here kyl and then if we look at the statue of liberty to give me your tired in your poor what i don't want people to take away from this hearing is all of a sudden we forgot about the tide of the poor and the people that are striving for a better life, so those are probably my biggest concerns when we what that he the president we sat and we have economic problems and we are getting out of them like we always do we and we will always prospered because we are resilient. but the question becomes what about the moral ground that we would see if we just said we are going to get about 11 million people and we are only going to focus on skilled workers we are not going to take care of this house and equal protection do you worry about that? >> i do. the fifth thing is our country is in a mess. we have a brain drain but not for the first time in history. it's never happened before. america has been a land. it is happening right now. if we wait to fix
if he would start with this one for us. i love this person is campbell. he or she goes by righttobeheard to read talk about why you've chosen to become a leader -- >> we can't hear you. >> you talked a little bit about why you chosen to become a leader of no labels. what will you do to convince the congress to join in as problem solvers? >> i believe there is as many frustrated people in conagra's as i am pittard i believe the 435 majority. when you hear about people making a deal if you hear about john boehner talking to the president or mitch mcconnell talking to the vice president or harry reid, there's a few people at the top trying to make these decisions thinking we should all fall. there's little reach the bottom to find out where we are coming from and it's based on seniority. that hasn't worked well. we haven't been able to fix much with that type of attitude so i know when we reach out and have 25, 30 of us and we are reaching across the aisle malae -- i will give you a perfect example. we had a problem with revenue and people said we don't have a revenue prob
to the sequestration and the year-long continuing resolution threat that looms before us. so that's the best we're going to be able to do this morning. it's the senate -- it's full glur i are. -- glory. >> there are sixteen days remaining between day and march 1st. sixteen days to define the strength for coming decades. they announced last week that he indefinitely delayed the deployment of the truman carrier strike in the middle east. they too carrier force presence our commander in the region is urgently requested over a long period of time admiral, i'm going run through quick, admiral, vice chairman of the joint chief recently made a statement. i want to make sure it gets in the record, quote, i know of no other time in history when we have come potentially down this far this fast in the defense budget. there could be for the first time in my career instances where we may be asked to respond to a crisis and we will have to say that we cannot do it. the secretary of defense and the hearing took place the other day on benghazi made it clear we don't have the assets necessary to carry out some
assessment tool that is available for folks to use. you can use it on your own and we will walk through it with you. the threat information is an area that folks look to the government and tell us what the threat is. we do a lot of briefings for the critical infrastructure sectors principally for the court making capital and also courtesy io. but increasingly in the cyber arena, the private sector has traffic information and we see this in the report that was released this week from the private sector we saw this last year from the think tank of in canada and there is a lot of good information out there about the nature of the threat and a lot of good information in the private sector about the specific signature information and indicators made for collaboration not only looking to the government solution. on vulnerability, the private sector owners and operators understand you understand your vulnerabilities better than anyone. so what we bring to this partnership is again these tools that take that data and make sense of it and the ip has developed tools that not only help you do an a
must end this uncertainty about this position. mr. president, it is time for us to end this debate. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersig
ones for bipartisanship, but i truly believe all of us know there is a smarter way to reduce our debt and deficit. we can do better than throwing up our hands and permitting these across-the-board cuts to go into effect. and we know the american people deserve better. that is exactly why democrats have put forward a credible, responsible plan to replace sequestration. our legislation builds on the precedent set in the year-end deal and it is in line with the balanced approach the american people favor. it would replace half of the first year of sequestration with responsible spending cuts and half of it with revenue for those who can afford it the most. our bill calls on the wealthiest americans to pay at least the same marginal tax rate on their income as our middle-income families pay. and it would eliminate needless tax breaks for oil and gas companies and companies shipping jobs overseas. and at the same time our replacement package would make responsible cuts. our bill would eliminate direct payments to farmers that have been paid out even during good times and for crops farmers
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
correctly the migrations, one is the immigration we have a kind of ins we used to have here that is issued in 2011 is an institution that deals with a border control and people that are living in mexico that would like to stay temporarily or permanently or with of the ministry to naturalize that want to become mexican. the same thing you have here. the challenge and the problem that they face is first, the southern border of mexico is shorter of course than the northern border, it's only a thousand kilometers but it is an extremely difficult geographic areas to control. you have the jungle, the rivers, mountains, and you have common border cities like in the u.s. and mexico that have a daily crossing with hundreds of thousands of people. then you have a big number of regular points of crossing which mexico doesn't have near the sources or the enforcement authorities or the border patrol equivalent to control. so, what the mexican government does is to stop the people as long as they begin to go to mexico and i would like to raise for your attention one issue that hasn't fully valued and co
and efficiency. >> you used the word new poll which is a charge toward. >> if you look at the facts expenditure which comes up depending upon how you counter that over chilean dollars a year and you looked at what they are, look at things like the exemption of employer contributions to health care and mortgage interest deductions and iras and 401k and these are worthy charitable deductions come from a don't think most people think of those things as the polls. these are policy choices that we made, and then maybe the wrong policy choices, but nonetheless, they are not opposed to men that did nothing that is what fdr had in mind when you made that statement. now, there obviously are loopholes. we talked about carried interest , that should be capital gain on ordinary income for. many others that can be identified, and i think that certainly that is something that for the stake of perceived fairness for economic equity and so forth that we should be going after. i don't think it is beautiful. think it is just probably unfortunate that people think that you should do that and sell the budget probl
entities use? >> there is no reason why they shouldn't be treated just a couple of reasons why. if you buy locally now, you probably pay five times what we would pay with an order of three or 4 million units of whatever. so, i think yeah, we will have failed if we don't build this cheaper than you could build it. >> finally, as we are building this, they're still will be the extensive expenses the states and governments have to come up with the dollars for to be able to build out their own interoperable communications with their first responders. so i hope that there is some accommodation and if we are going to control this, our spectrum within the low point in the states i hope he will also give us the capacity to possibly work out the leases that give us the of devotee and also to raise some dollars until local level so that we can buy and invest. >> the question is for the individual negotiating with at&t or sprint or verizon or could we cut a better deal nationwide? whichever way it goes, you want those savings back into the pricing structure. >> which then goes back to the governor me
using putting more and more on the backs of individuals. we've heard story after story this morning where there is irrational use in the delivery system because of the fragmentation that we have and we have seen through the payment reform that we have done that setting the right payment incentives in place actually does help rationalize the system and start to net the fabric together between the primary care and specialty care and we actually have hospitals that start to understand what their place in the reform system is there a cost center not a revenue center and they have to actually become smaller over time for the system to become sustainable, so to me, you know, to focus our attention on the individuals in the public and beneficiaries and how we are right to change their benefits to make all of this work seems like a full of air and when the real problem is the way that we have structured the incentive on the delivery system side and fixing that we can get a long range towards addressing affordability and quality. >> we have time for a question or two from the audience. if yo
us is it's not university our grassroots are companies but it sort of building networks that can carry innovation for spill my experience in corporate life is that there are strange people. not academic setting. >> you mentioned in our companies investing more in automation and not in early stage creative research. if you look at u.s. manufacturing, capital stock which is a reflection of basically how many machines, including 3-d printers, machines defined -- defined broadly, pretty much that used to grow every decade in america on the order of 25-55% a decade. our technology stock in manufacturing was doubled it in the 2000s it was zero essentially. which has never again happen in our history. the u.s. companies were not investing in automation initiatives. and secondly, we have this in her recent book, if you look at the share of corporate r&d as applied, excuse because basic, applied in development, we are the only industrial nation where the share of the corporate share in basic and applied to shrink in the last decade. every other country is expand their basic and applied fo
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
of academia and convincing businesses that working with us, we will produce the kind of worker that can answer the bell in the 21st century. thank you for your work in this area, and we are going to stay on it, and we are going to be aggressive and together, if ohio solve this problem of having skilled workers, it will be another incredible arrow in the arsenal of what we do to attract jobs and bring companies, not just expand in ohio, and not just somebody indiana, is somebody that might even come from india. let's do it together, okay? [applause] >> let me remind you of my background. i was in congress for 18 years. of those 18 years, i spent 10 years fighting to balance the budget. tom sawyer was there during some of those years. i even worked against the president of my own party when i thought he wasn't being aggressive enough. it wasn't comfortable. but i felt we needed to balance the federal budget. because of all that work i became chairman of the house budget committee. pretty amazing. and in 1997, i was one of the architects of the balanced budget agreement, and our budget was truly
a student in college. and his sisters were here with us today as well, domonique, shakeyta and rhunetta are attending the preparatory school of d.c. and are on similar path to opportunity. i visited his school yesterday and it isn't amazing. it is making a real difference in the lives of kids who, without that school, could possibly be lost. and this is what is at stake. because now they have great teachers, terrific administered, small class sizes and a mission that said every kid has got to succeed. now, no one should deny rashawn or his sisters this opportunity. [applause] >> joseph kelley nor any parent should have to wait for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income stude
to give in. they've got a president who wants to turn us into a third world country with all this taxing and redistribution of wealth. we've run out of wealth, by the way, it's just redistribution the crumbs on the table. and it's just too much. >> host: all right, june. let's listen to what nancy pelosi had to say. she was on the sunday talk shows yesterday, and here's what she had to say on this issue of a spending problem in washington. >> so it is almost a false argument to say we have a spending problem. we have a budget deficit problem that we have to address. right now we have low interest on the national debt, and a good time for us the to act to lower that deficit. we think the deficit and the national debt are at immoral levels. we think they must be reduced. we're sick and tired of paying interest on the national debt, and that's 15%. that's a large percentage of the budget. it's lower now because of the lower interest rate. >> host: so on this debate, spending cuts versus tax increases, here's what the washington times writes in their editorial: as mr. thornton points out, th
american and u.s. air in the really raleigh market? >> we -- the overlap, i think is just on the washington, d.c., flight. american serves the hubs for raleigh we serve our hubs from there. i think the overlap is limited to the one flight. >> all right. and i noticed -- and the prices on american and u.s. airways are virtually the same flying out of raleigh occur ram to d.c. how much overlap do you have in charlotte. >> virtually zero. we have a very large connecting hub in charlotte. >> all right. i believe u.s. air serves d.c. out of charlotte, i think they are probably the carrier that has the most flights out of charlotte to d.c. what years years would you anticipate the price difference is from raleigh to d.c. and charlotte to d.c. is? >> i don't know. it sounds like you might know. [laughter] >> it costas lot more money to fly from charlotte to d.c. than raleigh to washington. that's concerning. it's very concerning. and you're direct competitors in a route from raleigh to washington where as u.s. airways it doesn't have a direct competitor, so it costs more money. that would certainl
people and that is a sign that the negotiation is done on budget time. you use the opportunity to get what you want into the negotiation around budget time. >> what about the negro's? there is the negro factor. >> representative miller of memphis tennessee to get my questions are on the same line as the last speaker. when we talk about implicit racism and or by as institutionalized, the first place we should look at is our federal government, the largest governmental institutions and as some would say the most powerful institution, government institution in the world, but we can have the majority leader of the senate to say after the 2008 election our progress for the next four years is to defeat the president of the united states. i don't think that was fair based on the difference and the parties. however, the question is where do we begin with trying to change that meant devotee and attitude of the bias? >> not being a legislator i don't know that i have as much background as the brother to my right. i would simply say that there are two freds you could build on the republicans lik
or a democratic accomplishment. it was an accomplishment we achieved together. the next year we used those surplus tax dollars wisely. we put some in our state savings account, increasing our reserve levels. we used some to increase funding for education, targeting reading and early childhood initiatives. we used a portion of the surplus to cut taxes, to create more jobs by curbing the double and triple taxation in construction and in manufacturing. and we provided a tax credit to help small businesses hire those who deserve jobs the most. our veterans returning from afghanistan and iraq. [applause] we have seen some encouraging signs in our economy. tourism is on the rise. with more growth in visitors to new mexico than was expected in arizona or colorado. we are building our state's strongest-ever relationship with new mexico border governors focusing on developing a border region near santa teresa creating jobs. major companies are once again looking at new mexico. including two companies in the aviation industry that are relocating their headquarters to albuquerque. [applause] the manufacturin
of the u.s. senate. on nights watched key public policy this. and every week in the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> the programs that we had all under -- >> we are live now as u.s. chamber of commerce is hosting a quarterly briefing today on the outlook for the u.s. economy. martin regalia, chambers chief economist will talk about recent gross domestic product figure and what policy the obama administration and congress to propose to help stimulate the economy. this is just getting under way. >> a prime example of our ability to involve experts and debates on topics that are critical to the business community. i'm going to start us off today by queuing a video from christopher giancarlo of the gfi group, our sponsor, for this series. but for some want to make a brief announcement. this series, this economic series that we pose every quarter, has been accredited by the national association of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing prof
be very dangerous for us to let him think that that is acceptable behavior. so this may be changing north korea's tolerance for risk. and the fact kim jong-un may be under the assumption that we are becoming even more risk and tolerant -- and tolerant. that we will be risk averse and cost of first a look at our budgeting paper cutting back on our operational capacity, a special with sequestration threatening at the end of this month. kim jong-un may be reading this headline to the sequestration thinking, united states couldn't afford to operate. who knows what he thinks on these issues? that it's very, very dangerous to let him think that this is something that's going to be acceptable. of course, it's deeply dangerous to threatening and do not to act on it. so we have to be very serious when we make decisions as a government on what to do. i think we're also emboldening iran. iran's latest action on nuclear proliferation can partly be explained by the successful missile and nuclear launch from north korea. so these are feeding age of the. it's collaborative. and it is very dangerous. now
used to have officers from other schools come in and ab serve our training -- and observe our training at the school of infantry. so-a captain who would come over from camp johnson, which is where the admin is. so we're on the pt field, and we just got done with a run, and they're, you know, doing their round robin training stations, and there's a pull-up bar. and i had two of my staff ncos, the women, were up on the pull-up bar. and the captain says to me, you know, women are up on the pull-up bar. and i said, yeah, i know, they do pull-ups, they train with the marines, that's the way it works. women can't do pull-ups. [laughter] and we're standing 5 feet away from -- [laughter] and i said they're doing pull-ups. and he goes, they -- no. i mean, really, they can't do like real pull-ups. and i'm like, that's a real pull-up. he thinks they're wasting their time because they're not going to be evaluated to do pull-ups. you're wasting their time. and i said, have you ever asked your marines to do a pull-up? and he goes, no. ful i never asked them nothing that they couldn't do. so there's
, a victim of domestic violence, a victim of sexual violence is a victim. in my experience, when i used to go to crime scenes with the police in my former life, no police officer upon seeing a victim ever said, wait a minute. we've got to make sure whether this victim is native or nonnative, whether this victim is gay or straight, whether this victim is an immigrant or not. the police never did that. they said how do we find who did this and stop that from happening again. basically this amendment would say we have put some abusers off limits. madam president, i cannot vote something that would do that, and i hope the majority of senators would stay with those of us who put this bill together, stay with the bipartisan combination of senator cantwell and senator murkowski who have explored this issue and vote down this amendment. madam president, i would suggest the absence of a quorum and ask for time to be equally divided. the presiding officer: without objection. call the roll. quorum call: mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy:
kayatta with 30 minutes for debate equally divided in the usual form, upon the use or yielding back of that time the senate proceed to vote with no intervening action or debate on the nomination, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table with no intervening action or debate, and that no further motion be in order, that president obama be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mr. reid: i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. a senator: i ask the call of the quorum be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: last night president obama had the opportunity to present to the american people a plan and vision for how he intends to strengthen the state of our union. while i'm pleased he finally turned his focus back to the ongoing jobs crisis in our country, i was left feeling disappointed and frustrated that the president continued to call for higher taxes to pay for more and more gove
program you read last night. that did not tell us anything it but who was sponsoring. you could seek redress for that immediately. .. that went into karl rove's. and they didn't even take it. is that just politics or is that the power of the money and what superpacs is overrated? >> no it is not overrated. i was concerned a lot of reform groups saying the diversity spoke and i think diversity did speak in the election but this proves the money doesn't count that couldn't be further from the truth and money is first of all financing those campaign ads but ultimately it is about access. those checks are being cash right now to writing not just in congress but in the state legislatures from the country. that money is acted already and in 2014 we already know the money is going to be back in the screen to be smarter. in a situation that will be backed only it will be smarter next time. yes? >> my name is louis and i have a background in media on the business side and this is another perspective. having worked all the way to the "washington post," we have had to that advertising repe
to have you all with us today. it is my particular pleasure to welcome chris hughes to the ranks of the world which he may be a digital god but because of the new republic he's entered a world that is also one stooped in tradition. today's interview and conversation is going to be recorded by c-span, so i would ask you when you come down to ask questions later, those of you that interested come to these mics. the hash tag if you are falling on trotter is -- following on twitter is chrishughes. i don't need to introduce cress much to this group. obviously she is someone from hickory north carolina that got himself into harvard and by a fortuitous circumstances managed to be the roommate of mark zuckerburg and great importance in the creation of facebook. this happened in his sophomore year and he told me just a moment ago he was taking five classes in both semester's while the was going on and still managed to graduate with magna a couple of years later. facebook of course is something that has changed the world. mark zuckerberg was the fourth for the fifth as i am a stand. but th
president, there might be considerable more agreement on this. so i would ask each of us just to give serious thought to our constitutional responsibility to advise consent, and i would urge this committee and the senate as a whole not to march ahead with such speed that there is not sufficient time to accept -- except the family. just yesterday we discovered speeches did not disclose, and it is a quite mild threshold to ask what compensation has he personally received and deposited in his personal bank account in the last five years. i would suggest that would be a relevant concern for everyone. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator cruz. as i've mentioned before, my answer to the letter on this subject is now part of the record. first point that you raised, i said the following with regard to -- disclose all compensation over $5000. he has received over the past five years. instead financial disclosure form in which the committee requires all nominees to provide calls to provide, calls for the disclosure from which the nominee has received compensation in excess of $5000. a
, and responsiveness. he serves us. we don't serve him. he serves the american people. the american people send their money to washington and they expect it will be honestly and openly managed, accountable. they have every right to demand high performance from all officials, but particularly the director of the office of office of management and budget. surely there can be no higher duty for such an important official than to periodically report to the people truthfully on the importance affairs of state. specifically, to report the financial condition of the nation and to produce a budget plan that will fix it. without doubt, the great challenge of our time is how to confront effectively the unsustainable debt course we're now on. that is clearly the greatest threat to our republic. admiral mullen, the former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said debt is the greatest threat to our national security. we are heading to a financial crisis if we don't change. all experts have told us that, including the simpson and bowles of the president's debt commission. they said -- quote -- "this nation
. we gave 100 examples of how tax dollars were wasted last year. $450,000 for on used aret in my state. $325,000 for robot squirrels. this is a grant that was issued to study what we already know about robotic squirrels and their inches interactions with rattlesnakes. i can't see that that's a priority for us when we're running deficits that we need to be spending money on that type of research. we spend $91 million a year giving a -- you won't believe this -- charitable status to the nfl, the p.g.a., and cephal several other sports. so the progress they maker the p.g.a. the first taxes come to the federal government in terms of $91 million a year. i don't know a prosports team that isn't in the business for being profitable. but there are organizations where they send a lot of this money through. we are now hiding this money from the tax code. that's $91 million a year. why are we doing that? $27 million was spent by the state department on pottery classes in more rough morocco? why are we spending $27 million on pot aon pottery classes in morocco? the size of the state department is
increase in our fertility rates. that's the baby boom. that's the term which gets us. it really was a remarkable moment. it not only was the fertility rate increase quite i can put up to as high as 3.7 i think white americans and i think 3.9 for black americans, not only did it jump up but instead of for an entire generation, a really long lasting effect. people change the way they live for generations. again by 1970 that momentum, that moment had ended and we saw not a gradual float down but really the fertility rate dropping off the cliff. >> jonathan last and how changing demographics and birth rates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader. sunday night at nine eastern on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like us on facebook. >> now, a discussion on a state of libertarianism hosted by the cato institute. this hour-long forum includes a look at gun control, federal spending, and cases coming before the supreme court. >> i'm going to shorten everyone's bio in order to get to them. our first bigger is the executive vice president of the cato
about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the other governors on this letter. sam brownback from kansas, the governors of north dakota and south dakota, governor mary fallon from oklahoma, governor rick perry from texas. in addition to other governors that aren
in idaho but nationwide. the u.s. department of justice reported that the number of women killed by an intimate partner decreased by 35%. in 2012 it was reported that in one day alone 688 women and their children impacted by violence sought safety in an emergency shelter or received counseling, legal advocacy or children's support. while we may not agree on all the specifics of this reauthorization -- and there are portions of it that we will continue to negotiate on and to refine -- we do all agree on one very important idea, and that is that violence should not happen to anyone. and this critical legislation is very effective in helping to address that abuse in our society. as i said, there are parts of this legislation under which there still are concerns, and i am committed, as senator leahy is, to working with those who have concerns to make the bill better and more workable so that we can move it through to become law in this session of congress. but after we debate and after we work and define the legislation, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting the authorization
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will with great distinction. he will take care of our men and women in uniform and strengthen our national defense, he will do what he thinks is right even if it's not popular, and he is, finally, as everyone has said, a good and decent man. i thank in particular senator mccain for his very compelling and telling comment during our consideration before the vote in the armed services committee. he said -- and i agree -- no one should impugn chuck hagel's character. he's a person of integrity and character. and i believe that he will have the respect at all levels of our defense, men and women who serve and sacrifice every day, men and
and what's really happening there. um, and then that will put us in a much percent place to actually try to tackle the long-term, more persistent threats and allow us to focus our resources on those. >> host: michael daniel is the cybersecurity coordinator for the white house. gautham nagesh is the editor of technology executive briefing. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> coming up next, a discussion about nuclear weapons in the middle east and the decrease of u.s. influence in the region. then in about half an hour we're live with the closing session of the national governors' association's annual winter meeting as tv's dr. oz speaks to the group on government responsibility for the personal wellbeing of its citizens. and later the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when new hampshire senator, kelly ayotte, delivers the annual reading of president george washington's 1796 of farewell address. >>> also today on the c pan networks, the bipartisan policy center's housing commission releases its recommendations for future federal policy. i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)